Introduction: Conversational Habits ** The habitual ways in which we communicate with each other face-to-face

Conversational habits are the habitual ways in which we communicate with each other face-to-face. For example, the way in which we talk; the way in which we listen and the way in which we connect and bring others into our everyday conversations. As Conversational Leaders, we adopt positive conversational habits in our everyday interactions with people. … Continue reading Introduction: Conversational Habits ** The habitual ways in which we communicate with each other face-to-face

Talk to strangers ** The ability to talk with strangers is a critical skill

Do you recall when you were a child that your parent drilled into you never to talk to strangers? Well, you no longer need heed that advice. As an adult, the ability to talk with strangers is a critical skill.   Don’t listen to reply, listen to listen, there’s a difference. Eye contact is where all the … Continue reading Talk to strangers ** The ability to talk with strangers is a critical skill

Speak Truth To Power * To speak the truth to someone in authority in spite of the possible negative consequences

You may have come across the expression “speak truth to power” and wondered quite what it meant, and it’s origin. The Quakers coined the phrase during in the mid-1950s. It was a call for the United States to stand firm against fascism and other forms of totalitarianism. But it means something different these days. It … Continue reading Speak Truth To Power * To speak the truth to someone in authority in spite of the possible negative consequences

Don’t speak with conviction ** Speaking with conviction inhibits learning

In this blog post by Nancy Dixon Bringing the Flow of Knowledge to a Standstill by Speaking with Conviction  Nancy says: One way of talking that inhibits the exchange of knowledge is speaking with conviction. That may seem contrary to what we’ve all learned in communication and leadership workshops, where one of the lessons often … Continue reading Don’t speak with conviction ** Speaking with conviction inhibits learning

Learn to listen and to tell the truth ** Do we listen, to confirm what we already think or to reply?

Do we listen, to confirm what we already think or to reply? Or do we listen to discover something new? Do we enter into a conversation with a willingness to learn rather than the intent to force others to accept our views? Are we willing to learn? Are we willing to change? Are we open … Continue reading Learn to listen and to tell the truth ** Do we listen, to confirm what we already think or to reply?

Listen to ignite thinking ** Listening is not a passive act - it's a powerful act of creation

Listening is often seen as a passive act. It is not. It’s a powerful act of creation. Twenty or more years ago I came across this statement from Stephen Covey in talking about his fifth habit “Seek First to Understand, Then to be Understood” and it has had a profound impact on me. Most people … Continue reading Listen to ignite thinking ** Listening is not a passive act – it’s a powerful act of creation

Listen empathically ** Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply

Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply. Credit: Stephen R. Covey, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People Resources Using empathic listening to collaborate by Stephen R. Covey [Status: stub] Last updated: 9th May, 2016 Continue reading Listen empathically ** Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply

Don’t listen with the intent to reply ** Listen with the intent to understand

We all appreciate the benefits of listening such as listening to ignite other people’s thinking, but most of us are not that good at it. Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply. Credit: Stephen R. Covey, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People As Stephen … Continue reading Don’t listen with the intent to reply ** Listen with the intent to understand

A word of advice – don’t give it Advice is unfriendly to learning, especially when it is sought

At first thought, the idea that giving advice is a bad thing especially when sought seems a rather strange thing to say. Maybe we can accept the idea of not offering help when it is not requested. But when it is sought? Surely this makes no sense? Advice is unfriendly to learning, especially when it … Continue reading A word of advice – don’t give it Advice is unfriendly to learning, especially when it is sought

Banter! * The playful and friendly exchange of teasing remarks

What is banter? The playful and friendly exchange of teasing remarks. Credit: Oxford Dictionary I love gentle banter; it is a most wonderful, fun form of conversation. It is very English, but most cultures indulge in it. Not everyone “gets it” and some people easily take offense. Not everyone is good at it or enjoys … Continue reading Banter! * The playful and friendly exchange of teasing remarks

Stop ditting ** Ditting is the dubious art of sharing anecdotes while trying to trump the story of the previous person

Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply. Credit: Stephen R. Covey, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People In conversation, ditting is the dubious art of sharing anecdotes while trying to trump the story of the previous person. Too often discussions fall prone to it, … Continue reading Stop ditting ** Ditting is the dubious art of sharing anecdotes while trying to trump the story of the previous person

Learn by talking ** It is in the act of speaking that we organize cognitively what we know

We learn when we talk. Learning is a big part of what the Café is all about and at the center of Café conversational philosophy. When we have a conversation, we not only learn from others but paradoxically we learn from ourselves. We learn from the very act of talking. In these meetings individuals exchange … Continue reading Learn by talking ** It is in the act of speaking that we organize cognitively what we know